Cost of living

In Aarhus you find plenty of cafés and coffee bars. Photo: RUNI Photopop, Visit Aarhus

The standard of living in Denmark is high and the economy performs above the European average. Denmark is not an inexpensive country to live in. However, the costs of accommodation, food, transport and leisure are comparable to other Western European nations. Danish salaries are also correspondingly high, and many services such as medical treatment and schools are paid for via taxes and the Danish welfare system, so that no user fees are charged.  

Sample prices

Housing/RentEUR 330-600/month
Food and daily expensesEUR 200-350/month
Mobile phone  150 DKK (internet, around 250 DKK, may be included in your rent)  
Bus ticketEUR 2.70/ride (EUR 23 for ten-ride pass)  
Insurance (accident and personal belongings)EUR 270/year  
Estimated monthly expenses in total EUR 600-950

Opening a bank account

All international students are advised to open a Danish bank account. To do so, you must first obtain a Danish CPR number (i.e. ID number). When choosing a bank, we suggest that you ask your fellow students for recommendations. Opening an account is simple. Just bring your passport or ID card and CPR card to a branch. You will need to bring enough money or a credit card for the first few weeks of your stay in Denmark. For example, you will need enough cash to pay the rent and deposit on your accommodation – as well as to buy housewares for your new room. Make sure you can use your credit card in Denmark. Check your cash withdrawal limit. If you are already a customer of a large international bank, you should soon be able to transfer money directly from your home account to your Danish bank account. 

"Nemkonto" - the public payment system

You need to register your Danish bank account with the Danish tax authority as a  ‘Nemkonto’ (i.e. an ‘easy account’), which will allow public authorities to make direct payments to you – such as wages, tax rebates or maintenance payments. Seek advice from your Danish bank.