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Programme

Live speed lectures from 14:00 to 20:00

All the speed lectures will be live-streamed and have a duration of maximum 30 minutes.
Your camera and microphone are turned off during the lecture but it will be possible for you to send questions to the researchers by means of the chat function in Zoom.


14:00: Archaeology to the rescue! What can we learn from the past?

Dusty file cabinets, mysterious artefacts stashed in museums' cellars, whips and snakes in a jungle, pyramids and Vikings. Archaeology is the coolest discipline of science! The past is like uncharted territory where with each new discovery, we are piecing together the stories of our distant ancestors. These stories are relevant to the world around us. They show how human groups dealt with challenges. Climate change, social unrest, economic crises, pandemics – we've been there before so we can learn a lot from our ancestors' strategies and their successes and failures.

Speaker: Iza Romanowska, Postdoc, Aarhus Institute of Advanced Studies
Research field: 
Archaeology

 

14:00: How not to lose millions – securing blockchains

Blockchains are the underlying technology for crypto-currencies, but they also have many other uses. A lot of value is stored on blockchains. Due to their distributed nature, billions of kroner have been lost due to small programming errors. In this lecture we will see how computer supported logic can help detect and prevent these accidents. A video with a popular description of blockchain technology can be found here 

Speaker: Bas Spitters, Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science
Research field: 
Computer Science

SEE TEASER VIDEO

See PowerPoint presentation

 

14:30: What can we learn from Google searches?

We have all used Google to search for stuff we need or find interesting. What few people know is that these searches can be used to predict important things about the future. In my research I show that data from Google can be used to predict important indicators about the economy, such as the unemployment rate and house prices.

Speaker: Erik Christian Montes Schütte, Assistant Professor, Department of Economics and Business Economics
Research field: 
Economics and finance

  

14:30: Risk-Informed Digital Twin for sustainable and resilient urban communities

This talk will discuss the 'Risk-Informed Digital Twin' (RDT), a novel multiscale multidimensional opensource computational platform for sustainability and resilience of the urban communities. The Digital Twin (DT) is a virtual replica of urban, environmental energy and human systems created and maintained in order to answer questions about its physical part, the Physical Twin (PT). Different from the current Digital Twin technologies, in the RDT a comprehensive consideration of the uncertainties is included.

Speaker: Umberto Alibrandi, Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering
Research field: 
Risk analysis, machine learning, digital twin for the built environment

   

15:00: Do interest-only mortgages ('afdragsfrie lån') help young households on the housing market?

Interest-only mortgages (afdragsfrie lån) were introduced in 2003 in Denmark with the stated purpose of helping young people and first-time buyers enter the housing market. This lecture argues that these new mortgages did not help young households enter the housing market, but instead lead to rising house prices. While interest-only mortgages are valuable products, the lessons from 2003 show that other solutions are necessary to help young households enter the housing market.

Speaker: Claes Bäckman , Assistant Professor, Department of Economics and Business Economics
Research field: 
Housing markets

   

15:00: Life with a bioreactor: the fermenting microbes within us

We know that microbes ferment food and daily consume fermented cheese, yoghurt, beer, vegetables, meat and fish. At the same time, our gastrointestinal tract is similar to a bioreactor filled with billions of highly active gut microbes, which also ferment. What is fermentation, what happens inside our gut, what are the problems if the fermentation in our gut fails, and how do food microbes react if they encounter their colleagues from the intestine? These questions will be answered in this lecture.

Speaker: Clarissa Schwab, Associate Professor, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering
Research field: 
Food and gut biotechnology

    

15:30: Do cognitive mechanisms underpin supernatural explanations of unpredictable, negative life events?

Supernatural explanations of negative life events, such as misfortune, illness and natural catastrophes, occur in all cultures around the world. Research has shown that this is not due to a gap of knowledge since most people are aware of at least some of the natural mechanistical causal factors underpinning such events. In addition, non-believers also seem to perceive these sort of events as 'meant to be'. Hence, this research explores a double-sided hypothesis that supernatural explanations (1) may fill a fundamental cognitive need for prediction to which these sorts of events represent a threat, and (2) may arise from a human tendency to understand causality in terms of morality. Results from our studies mainly show evidence that the perception of wrongdoing triggers supernatural causal attributions of these events in terms of punishment (i.e. God’s punishment) or automatic retribution (i.e. Karma). We make several psychological and evolutionary propositions on why that might be the case.

Speaker: Mathilde Hernu, PhD student, School of Culture and Society
Research field: 
Religion, cognition and culture

    

15:30: Alternative feelings for Germany

The 'Alternative für Deutschland' (AfD) is the first far-right nationalist party to be successful in Germany after the end of Second World War. This speed lecture will introduce a new way of understanding the rise of the AfD in Germany´s exceptional historical context and explain why it is crucial to analyse how the AfD mobilises a variety of feelings to challenge modern Germany’s politico-cultural order.

Speaker: Sophie Schmalenberger, PhD student, School of Culture and Society
Research field: 
Far-right politics in Europe

SEE TEASER VIDEO

    

16:00: A roller coaster ride into the future: how to read the ancient Sibylline Oracles

The Sibylline Oracles are Greek verse prophecies about the course of world history, composed and edited over several centuries before being taken up by early Christian writers. This talk tests three ways of understanding this intriguing collection and suggests how literary scholars can use it today.

Speaker: Helen Van Noorden, AIAS-COFUND Fellow, Aarhus Institute of Advanced Studies
Research field: 
Classics and theology

    

16:00: Risk-Informed Digital Twin for sustainable and resilient urban communities

This talk will discuss the 'Risk-Informed Digital Twin' (RDT), a novel multiscale multidimensional opensource computational platform for sustainability and resilience of the urban communities. The Digital Twin (DT) is a virtual replica of urban, environmental energy and human systems created and maintained in order to answer questions about its physical part, the Physical Twin (PT). Different from the current Digital Twin technologies, in the RDT a comprehensive consideration of the uncertainties is included.

Speaker: Umberto Alibrandi, Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering
Research field: 
Risk analysis, machine learning, digital twin for the built environment

    

16:30: Microbial electrosynthesis: 'eating' electricity and 'breathing' CO2

Some microorganisms can consume electrons and breathe carbon dioxide to produce, for example, biofuels. This process is known as microbial electrosynthesis. The characterisation and full understanding of this process would allow carbon dioxide transformation into valuable products. Such technology could contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. Additionally, this process can be particularly useful to store the intermittent overproduction of energy from renewable sources.

Speaker: Laura Munoz, PhD Student, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering
Research field: 
Biotechnology

    

16:30: Are plants a product of their genes or the environment?

Plant breeders use the genetic information of their plants to select the best individuals. However, this is just a part of the story. Individual plants respond differently to the environment they grow in, which obscures the genetic information. We use molecular techniques and statistics to investigate important aspects of how the environment, genetics and plants interact. The findings can help the breeder to more accurately select the right plants.

Speaker: Anja Karine Ruud, Postdoc, Center for Quantitative Genetics and Genomics
Research field: 
Crop genetics and genomics

    

17:00: Are the boards in organisations prepared for COVID and changing times?

The lecture will report on ongoing research at AU and introduce the topic of organisation future-preparedness. We are currently interviewing board members of Danish and European companies (also social and non-profit organisations) asking what directors are doing in regard to helping executive managers maintain future-orientation and future-preparedness in uncertain and changing times. We will report highlights of interim findings, with regard to COVID period and beyond.

Speaker: Adam Gordon, Associate Professor, Department of Magement
Research field: 
Strategic foresight

    

17:00: Does music make you smarter?

From using the music of Mozart to studying many couples of twins, researchers have tried for decades to understand whether music listening and learning improve your cognitive abilities. But have they succeeded? The answer is not as simple as one may think and reveals a lot about the nature of music, the brain and those who study them.

Speaker: David Ricardo Quiroga Martinez, Postdoc, Department of Clinical Medicine
Research field: Music neuroscience

    

17:30: Design new battery packs for electric vehicles

Can we design an advanced, modular, and scalable Li-ion battery pack for mid-size vehicles, to fully charge in less than 6 minutes and drive 700 km on a single charge?

Speaker: Corneliu Barbu, Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Research field: Electrical energy technology

    

17:30: Epigenetics and what a plant remembers

In contrast to most animals, plants cannot move to escape their surroundings. Therefore they must cope with all sorts of natural conditions. One of the intriguing plant talents that help to cope with these conditions is memory. Whether they live just one season or hundreds of years, plants can store memories and even learn from their experiences. The lecture will explore the idea of ‘epigenetic memory’ and how it helps plants remember winter.

Speaker: Marta Malinowska, Assistant Professor, Center for Quantitative Genetics and Genomics
Research field: Plant epigenetics

    

18:00: Smaller, faster, more agile, yet safer drones

This speed lecture will elaborate on state-of-the-art drone applications, e.g. autonomous drone racing and fully autonomous cinematography system for aerial drones. The aim is letting the onboard artificial intelligence completely take over the film directing.

Speaker: Erdal KayacanAssociate Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Research field: 
Robotics

    

18:00: The secret life of biofilms

Biofilms are communities of bacterial cells attached to various surfaces and causing chronical infections. Extracellular matrix composed of biopolymers is used by bacteria if they are stressed or placed in a toxic environment. Of particular importance are extracellular nucleic acids that can adapt different structures and bind different small molecules giving new biophysical properties to the biofilms. Let us take a journey into a secret life of biofilms and discuss how to combat them.

Speaker: Gabriel Antonio MineroPostdoc, Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO)
Research field: 
Biochemistry

SEE TEASER VIDEO

    

18:30: Are the boards in organisations prepared for COVID and changing times?

The lecture will report on ongoing research at AU and introduce the topic of organisation future-preparedness. We are currently interviewing board members of Danish and European companies (also social and non-profit organisations) asking what directors are doing in regard to helping executive managers maintain future-orientation and future-preparedness in uncertain and changing times. We will report highlights of interim findings, with regard to COVID period and beyond.

Speaker: Adam Gordon, Associate Professor, Department of Magement
Research field: 
Strategic foresight

    

18:30: Does music make you smarter?

From using the music of Mozart to studying many couples of twins, researchers have tried for decades to understand whether music listening and learning improve your cognitive abilities. But have they succeeded? The answer is not as simple as one may think and reveals a lot about the nature of music, the brain and those who study them.

Speaker: David Ricardo Quiroga Martinez, Postdoc, Department of Clinical Medicine
Research field: Music neuroscience

    

19:00: Design new battery packs for electric vehicles

Can we design an advanced, modular, and scalable Li-ion battery pack for mid-size vehicles, to fully charge in less than 6 minutes and drive 700 km on a single charge?

Speaker: Corneliu Barbu, Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Research field: Electrical energy technology

    

19:00: Much more than beer: Other amazing things you can do with enzymes coupled with engineering

This lecture will give a brief introduction to Biocatalysis and Bioprocess Engineering, and show selected state-of-the-art research that we perform every day in our labs: From obtaining sustainable fuels using light to revolutionary methods of synthesis of important products for our daily life. Take a look into the ‘green’ side of chemistry. Engineering meets biocatalysis!

Speaker: Postdoc Santiago Chanquia, PhD Student Milica Milic and PhD Student Piera De SantisDepartment of Biological and Chemical Engineering
Research field: Biocatalysis and bioprocessing

See PowerPoint presentation

    

19:30: The secret life of biofilms

Biofilms are communities of bacterial cells attached to various surfaces and causing chronical infections. Extracellular matrix composed of biopolymers is used by bacteria if they are stressed or placed in a toxic environment. Of particular importance are extracellular nucleic acids that can adapt different structures and bind different small molecules giving new biophysical properties to the biofilms. Let us take a journey into a secret life of biofilms and discuss how to combat them.

Speaker: Gabriel Antonio MineroPostdoc, Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO)
Research field: 
Biochemistry

SEE TEASER VIDEO